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PostSubject: The Oil Spill   Mon 03 May 2010, 5:50 pm

First topic message reminder :

Need I say more?

I still have my doubts about the Iceland eruption. Not the actual event but how they managed it. And now this. Reports range from the pipe rupturing when the rig toppled all the way to N Korea using torpedoes. I just saw and image showing the spill covering most of the gulf. That is of course if that is what's really happening. They can say anything, doctor maps, present eye witnesses, oil soaked birdies you name it to support their story. Seems to me they already cleared out LA pretty well after the levee breach. I've read woo woo stuff elsewhere predicting a huge diaspora that is to happen due to an event. Maybe they're going to give the gulf sates to China. Just thinking out loud...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/03/oil-spill-tripled-in-size_n_560883.html

The PTB never waste a crisis. We're in the problem phase now I've heard reports of SWAT teams on rigs (whatever that means) but I haven't seen much managing of the reaction other than soft shoeing the severity of the gusher in the media. I wonder if they'll EVER get this thing capped...

So folks, what will be the glorious overlord's solution to this one?
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Thu 03 Jun 2010, 12:28 am

Here's Orlov with his vectored contribution.

http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2010/05/american-chernobyl.html

The drawing of parallels between industrial accidents is a dubious armchair sport, but here the parallels are just piling up and are becoming too hard to ignore:

• An explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 spewed radioactive waste across Europe

• A recent explosion and sinking of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil drilling platform is spewing heavy oil into the Gulf of Mexico

These accidents were both quite spectacular. At Chernobyl, the force of the explosion, caused by superheated steam inside the reactor, tossed the 2500-tonne reactor lid 10-14 meters into the air where it twirled like a tossed penny and came to rest back on the wrecked reactor. The cloud of superheated vapor then separated into a large volume of hydrogen gas, which detonated, demolishing the reactor building and adjoining structures. At Deepwater Horizon, a blowout of a recently completed oil well sent an uncontrolled burst of oil and gas, pressurized to over 10,000 psi by the 25000-foot depth of the well, up to the drilling platform, where it detonated, causing a fire. The rig then sank, and came to rest in a heap of wreckage on top of the oil well, which continues to spew at least 200,000 gallons of oil a day. Left unchecked, this would amount to 1.7 million barrels of oil per year, for an indefinite duration. This amount of oil may be enough to kill off or contaminate all marine life within the Gulf of Mexico, to foul the coastline throughout the Gulf and, thanks to the Gulf Stream, through much of the Eastern Seaboard, at least to Cape Hatteras in North Carolina and possibly beyond. A few tarballs will probably wash up as far north as Greenland.

The Chernobyl disaster was caused more or less directly by political appointeesm: the people in charge of the reactor control room had no background in nuclear reactor operations or nuclear chemistry, having got their jobs through the Communist Party. They attempted a dangerous experiment, executed it incompetently, and the result was an explosion and a meltdown. The Deepwater Horizon disaster will perhaps be found to have similar causes. BP, which leased and operated Deepwater Horizon, is chaired by one Carl-Henric Svanberg—a man with no experience in the oil industry. The people who serve on the boards of directors of large companies tend to see management as a sort of free-floating skill, unrelated to any specific field or industry, rather similarly to how the Soviet Communist party thought of and tried to use the talents of its cadres. Allegations are already circulating that BP drilled to a depth of 25000 feet while being licensed to drill up to 18000 feet, that safety reviews of technical documents had been bypassed, and that key pieces of safety equipment were not installed in order to contain costs. It will be interesting to see whether the Deepwater Horizon disaster, like the Chernobyl disaster before it, turns out to be the direct result of management decisions made by technical incompetents.

More importantly, the two disasters are analogous in the unprecedented technical, administrative, and political challenges posed by their remediation. In the case of Chernobyl, the technical difficulty stemmed from the need to handle high level radioactive waste. Chunks of nuclear reactor fuel lay scattered around the ruin of the reactor building, and workers who picked them up using shovels and placed them in barrels received a lethal radiation dose in just minutes. To douse the fire still burning within the molten reactor core, bags of sand and boron were dropped into it from helicopters, with lethal consequences for the crews. Eventually, a concrete sarcophagus was constructed around the demolished reactor, sealing it off from the environment. In the case of Deepwater Horizon, the technical difficulty lies with stemming a high-pressure flow of oil, most likely mixed with natural gas, gushing from within the burned, tangled wreck of the drilling platform at a depth of 5000 feet. An effort is currently underway to seal the leak by lowering a 100-ton concrete-and-steel "contraption" onto it from a floating crane and using it to capture and pump out the oil as it leaks out. I think "sarcophagus" sounds better.

The administrative challenge, in the case of Chernobyl, lay in evacuating and resettling large urban and rural populations from areas that were contaminated by the radiation, in preventing contaminated food products from being sold, and in dealing with the medical consequences of the accident, which includes a high incidence of cancer, childhood leukemia and birth defects. The effect of the massive oil spill from Deepwater Horizon is likely to cause massive dislocation within coastal communities, depriving them of their livelihoods from fishing, tourism and recreation. Unless the official efforts to aid this population are uncharacteristically prompt and thorough, their problems will bleed into and poison politics.

The political challenges, in both cases, centered on the inability of the political establishment to acquiesce to the fact that a key source of energy (nuclear power or deep-water oil) relied on technology that was unsafe and prone to catastrophic failure. The Chernobyl disaster caused irreparable damage to the reputation of the nuclear industry and foreclosed any further developments in this area. The Deepwater Horizon disaster is likely to do the same for the oil industry, curtailing any possible expansion of drilling in deep water, where much of the remaining oil is to be found, and perhaps even shutting down the projects that have already started. In turn, this is likely to hasten the onset of the terminal global oil shortage, which the US Department of Energy and the Pentagon have forecast for 2012.

Translate "industrial accident" into Russian and back into English, and what you get is "technogenic catastrophe". This term got a lot of use after the Chernobyl disaster. It is rather more descriptive than the rather flaccid English phrase, and it puts the blame where it ultimately comes to rest in any case: with the technology, and the technologists and politicians who push it. Technology that can and sometimes does fail catastrophically, causing unacceptable levels of environmental devastation, is no good, regardless of how economically necessary it happens to be. It must be shut down. In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, we are already hearing that expansion of deep-water drilling is "dead on arrival". This could be the beginning of the end for the huge but dying beast that is the petrochemical industry, or more such accidents may be required for the realization finally to sink in and the cry of "Shut it down!" to be heard.

The energy industry has run out of convenient, high-quality resources to exploit, and is now forced to turn to resources it previously passed over: poor, dirty, difficult, expensive resources such as tar sands, heavy oil, shale, and deep offshore. Under relentless pressure to do more with less, people are likely to try to cut corners wherever possible, and environmental safety is likely to suffer. Before it finally crashes, the huge final effort to wring the last few drops of energy out of a depleted planet will continue to serve up bigger and bigger disasters. Perhaps the gruesome aftermath of this latest accident will cause enough people to proclaim "Enough! Shut it all down!" But if not, there is always the next one.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Thu 03 Jun 2010, 1:07 am

incognito wrote:
Here's Orlov with his vectored contribution.
I met this punk about 2 years ago. He gave a talk so I went to go see him.

I despised him for what he was doing - scaring the living crap out of Americans. He seemed to revel in it.

I found it utterly ironic that American's were there spellbound listening to a 5'4" Russian operative who obviously has the greatest disdain for the USA.

I wonder how many Soviet intelligence operatives they've brought to the USA to help in their psywar.

He brings up a good point though with Chernobyl. Both events were obviously manufactured as psychological attacks on the nations' psyche. Seems to be tracking the same playbook. I hadn't caught that before.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 7:44 am

http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=news/state&id=7481524

Man arrested for swimming in Grand Isle waters

GRAND ISLE, LA -- The Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office says a man has been arrested for swimming in waters shut down because of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

WAFB-TV reported Sunday that Grand Isle Police took 22-year-old Jesus Mares, of College Station, Texas, into custody around 7:30 a.m. after he was caught wading in the water just off the beach.

The state Department of Environmental Quality shut down the beach after it was declared hazardous and unsafe for swimming. Authorities say because of contaminants on his body, Mares had to be taken to a decontamination unit on Grand Isle. He was then booked with criminal trespassing and remaining after being forbidden.

Mares was later released on $200 bond.
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PostSubject: BP Shows its Colors - "The Plan Is to Let Us Die"   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 3:33 pm

'The Plan Is to Let Us Die,' Coastal Parish President Says


By SABRINA CANFIELD
June 6, 2010


GALLIANO, La. (CN) - Almost 70 miles of Louisiana coast are soaked
with oil. That's more land than the seashores of Maryland and Delaware
combined, Gov. Bobby Jindal said Monday after Secretary of the Interior
Ken Salazar and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano were
flown over the devastated coast. Napolitano said the federal government
would "disperse it, boom it, burn it," to keep more oil from coming
ashore. But St. Bernard Parish President Craig Taffaro had a different
idea. "I would be betting the plan is to let us die," Taffaro said.

Federal officials delivered messages similar to Napolitano's, but none
wanted to address an incident that occurred last weekend, when BP and
the Coast Guard abandoned 44 boats loaded with boo

BP was nowhere in sight as the oil inundated the fragile marshes. And
the oil company has provided little explanation about what made it jump
ship rather fight the oil as it hit land.

BP has continued to spray two chemical dispersants into the Gulf
despite an order by the Environmental Protection Agency to end the
spraying on Sunday night. The chemical dispersants, made by Corexit,
are banned in BP's homeland, the United Kingdom, because of their
toxicity.

Ever since the April 20 explosion of the BP oil rig the Deepwater
Horizon, oil has spewed unchecked from a broken well at the bottom of
the Gulf of Mexico. At least 6 million gallons of crude have already
gushed into the Gulf, though the estimates vary widely. Some experts
have said that every week the spill has dumped more than the 11 million
gallons the Exxon Valdez released off the Alaskan coast in 1989, in
what was formerly the worst oil spill in U.S. history.
Far below Louisiana's fragile wetlands are reserves of crude oil and
other valuable minerals. Local residents speculated on Monday that BP
is after the mineral rights, which it cannot touch while the wetlands
are alive.

It's a grim prospect, perhaps far-fetched, but not for those who live
along the 70 miles of oil-saturated coast, who wonder what the heck
happened this weekend when BP refused to fight the incoming oil.
"We can actually see birds that are covered in oil," Gov. Jindal said Monday at the news conference in Galliano.
"It is clear that we do not have the resources to protect our coast,"
Jindal said, describing the past weekend, as booms and workers "sat for
days waiting for orders" and got no direction approval from BP or the
federal government.

The Army Corps of Engineers has continued to drag its feet on whether
to approve dredging plans to create a barrier around Louisiana's
wetlands. BP officials have not proposed any plan to prevent the oil
from moving away from the broken well and into Louisiana's fragile
marshes.

Salazar said he will do everything he can to keep Louisiana's coast from disappearing.
"We're going to keep the boot on the map," Salazar said, referring to the shape of his the state.
Interior Secretary Salazar and other federal officials continue to
claim that damages will be kept at a minimum, and have been managed to
get BP to acknowledge responsibility for the continuing disaster, but
Louisiana officials and residents say there is no plan in sight to
protect them.

Many environmental experts have said that an oil cleanup might cause
more harm to the coastline than just leaving it there, so the only
viable option is to keep the oil away.
A caller from St. Tammany Parish broke into tears Monday on a talk show
on radio WWL. "All they're trying to do is destroy the wetlands so they
can get the mineral rights to all of whatever is under" the wetlands,
the woman said.

The Obama administration questioned BP's competence on Sunday, when
Salazar told reporters he was "not completely" confident BP knows what
it's doing.

For local residents, BP's violation of the Sunday night deadline to
stop using the toxic dispersant felt like a slap in the face.
"Are they just going to continue spraying this stuff until someone
sends them to jail?" Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser asked
on WWL radio Monday night.

Nungesser said he and other coastal parish presidents are fed up with
BP and the federal government. Nungesser said he intends to take
matters into his own hands, whether the Corps of Engineers issues his
parish the emergency permit he applied for on May 13 or not, and
whether BP decides help keep oil out of the wetlands or not.
"We are giving the Corps 24 hours" to issue the emergency permits,
Nungesser said on WWL. "We are giving them the opportunity to do the
right thing. But even without their permit, we will protect our
parish."

After 24 hours, permit or not, Nungesser said Plaquemines Parish will
begin dredging and building emergency berms, as a last line of defense
against oil intrusion into Plaquemines Parish marshes.

"If we don't do it, our marsh will be destroyed," Nungesser said.
The wetlands are prime breeding habitat for dozens or hundreds of
species of wildlife, including fish, crustaceans and birds.
"We're heavily invested in doing the very best job that we can," BP spokesman Mark Salt said on WWL radio Monday.
Doug Suttles, BP's chief operating officer, said Monday that BP will
spend $500 million in the next 10 years to study the effects of the
Deepwater Horizon catastrophe, including the environmental effects of
the dispersant.

As it became clear Monday that BP had not followed orders to stop using
Corexit, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson said that BP does not have to
stop using it completely, but asked BP to limit its use of the
dispersant and to find a less toxic replacement.

Richard Dennison, a senior scientist with the Environmental Defense
Fund wrote on the group's website Monday that Corexit 9527 and Corexit
9500, the two forms BP is using, are "among the least effective of the
18 dispersants that EPA has approved under the National Oil and
Hazardous Pollution Contingency Plan."

Dennison wrote that the dispersants "appear to be among the more toxic
based on limited short-term toxicity tests conducted on fish and
shrimp."

BP has been using Corexit during the oil spill catastrophe in far greater quantities than ever before in U.S. history.
Jackson said other chemicals the EPA wanted BP to consider appear to be less toxic and more effective than Corexit.
"My concern is they appear to be going out of their way to find problems with these other chemicals," Jackson said.

Propublica reported last week that Corexit was used after the Exxon
Valdez disaster and was later linked with health problems, including
respiratory, nervous system, liver, kidney, and blood disorders. One of
the two Corexit products that BP is suing in the Gulf also contains a
compound that is associated with headaches, vomiting and reproductive
problems, according to the Propublica report.

http://www.courthousenews.com/2010/05/25/27551.htm
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 4:02 pm

I spent a bit of time down there immediately after Katrina, helping people and helping with clean-up. I'm tempted to fly down again, because I want to see for myself what is really going on. I don't believe any of these stories now, and I was not able to validate any of the media reports coming out of the
gulf during Katrina then, even though I was there. I just don't believe that a spill ever occurred. I think this entire event is contrived, and the only way to know is just to go down and see for oneself.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 4:46 pm

Corexit 9500...

We have no idea at this point how bad it will get. I'm not optimistic.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 4:49 pm

I hear what you're saying They Live, completely. In the meantime, home made 'tubes carry much more weight than 'official' info IMO. Be very careful if ya decide to go down there...



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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 5:22 pm

I don't buy this guy's Youtube. His Youtube channel title is Boycott Petroleum. Change Now. This guy has got an agenda, which is consistent with the globalist's agenda.

Where would you suggest one going if they went down there? I spent time in Mississippi Gulf post-Katrina, so I know that area well. I have not spent any time on the Alabama gulf coast. So, any suggestions for locations to see?

And why would you think I would need to be careful? I can't foresee any danger. What am I missing? Post Katrina, I couldn't have been treated better by the locals. The media reports were all totally bogus.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 5:27 pm

I'm not familiar with the area at all They Live. I say be careful because they are running some kind of OP down there. If you do decide to go, please bring back some REAL documentation, as there is so much noise it's becoming just another distraction.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 6:29 pm

incognito wrote:
I'm not familiar with the area at all They Live. I say be careful because they are running some kind of OP down there. If you do decide to go, please bring back some REAL documentation, as there is so much noise it's becoming just another distraction.
Got any idea or suggestions for REAL documentation?

I started to do some surfing on the web, and here are a few things of interest I found.

Here's an oil spill tracker


http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/gulf_of_mexico_oil_spill_anima.html

And here is the Alabama hottie, with quite a different perspective on the area. Perhaps I should just book a condo and go for a 1-week summer holiday. Looks gorgeous down there.



Then I found the Federal Fisheries Closure map
http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/deepwater_horizon_oil_spill.htm

And this is Deepwater Horizon Incident Emergency Response site with frequent Oil Trajectory Map updates.
http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/topic_subtopic_entry.php?RECORD_KEY%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=entry_id,subtopic_id,topic_id&entry_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=809&subtopic_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=2&topic_id%28entry_subtopic_topic%29=1
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 07 Jun 2010, 9:24 pm

She better get those roots touched up. Hottie for sure regardless. I'm glad she paints such a sunny outlook on the situation. Hey the beach is open for walking and sunbathing too bad (based on her report) you won't find out you can't go in the water till after the time share presentation...

I'd recommend checking with a few offshore fishing charters if they will take you out go have a nice day fishing. Mention to them you're interested in going after tarpon redfish maybe pompano down in the Keys, get the guide to give you a referral. Discern their feedback. Try to get them to be candid. Bring a video camera, record any anomalies you see. Drive down the coast(s) and talk to people, get them on tape too.

Any ideas, C1?
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 12:06 am

They Live wrote:
I spent a bit of time down there immediately after Katrina, helping people and helping with clean-up. I'm tempted to fly down again, because I want to see for myself what is really going on. I don't believe any of these stories now, and I was not able to validate any of the media reports coming out of the
gulf during Katrina then, even though I was there. I just don't believe that a spill ever occurred. I think this entire event is contrived, and the only way to know is just to go down and see for oneself.

What a super idea. :-) I envy you--and I ALSO think it possible the entire 'spill' is a deception. What's not a deception though, imo is the deadly Corexit floating around the Gulf where I think it was probably placed strategically so-as to destroy the *most *fertile* inland areas. If it were me going, I would spend time talking to the locals mostly....they would likely have some interesting insights.

Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 10:17 am

incognito wrote:
I'd recommend checking with a few offshore fishing charters if they will take you out go have a nice day fishing. Mention to them you're interested in going after tarpon redfish maybe pompano down in the Keys, get the guide to give you a referral. Discern their feedback. Try to get them to be candid. Bring a video camera, record any anomalies you see. Drive down the coast(s) and talk to people, get them on tape too.

Why reference the Keys? Isn't that too far south, or are you suggesting trying to hit the Florida Gulf Coast as well? I was thinking of just trying to hit Alabama and maybe the western side of the Florida pan handle.



Under this June 1st video, it says:

The NOAA forecast does predict the possibility of oil impact on the western end of our island. Today our beaches remain beautiful and we are open for business. Red Snapper season started today and charter boats are fishing. Stay informed at www.OrangeBeach.com

I also found this Alabama real estate agent who is video blogging everyday from Alabama coast, and he's interesting. http://bruceatthebeach.info



I started looking into vacation housing down there, just to see availability and costs, and things look to be pretty booked up. I was actually thinking about trying to turn this into a mini vacation, as it looks so nice down there. I'll keep researching, but it makes me wonder what the economic intent of the OP was, given that it hit right at the beginning of the summer busy season for coastal operators.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 11:58 am

I was not sure where you were going They Live I mentioned the Keys because I heard the fishing was good down there for the species I mentioned. I watched the vids you posted and followed the links provided. Particularly interesting was the fishing info.

If you decide to go I'm very interested to hear a man on the ground report.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 1:42 pm

Spoke to a switched on friend about the situation down there and he forwarded me some emails that he had sent to others. He said it was okay to share these online, so here is the first email, which I guess he sent out early on in the process.

Quote :
What's the angle?

There's already some noise on the web that a 'smart bomb' made the hole
in the platform helicopter deck -- but my analysis is the hole is what
I'd expect of an aluminum plate deck in a sustained oil inferno.
(aluminum melts at 1000 F unlike the 8" think steel girders of the WTC).

There was no need for smart bombs, cruise missiles, or Plan 9 from Outer
Space. Look at the corps in total control of the rig. BP, Haliburton,
and Transocean. Guess who's going to investigate it? (Haliburton). I
personally suspect the PTB wanted this spill to happen. The question to
stay focused upon is who let the fail-safes fail. There were multiple
ways to shut down a breech like this but none were activated in time.

If you ask me we'll see gas pump price shoot up as it had been doing
this time every year from 2004-2008. Recall the BP refinery explosion
in Texas in 2005, which was never fully explained. They never are. This rig
explosion and leak will never be explained. Unlike the the Exxon Valdez
they can't pin it on a drunk driver.

And here is a more recent email with a few links.

Quote :
I noticed a couple of weeks ago the announcements of imminent
destruction of the beaches of the Gulf States wasn't happening. I lived
in Texas during the Mexican oil spill around 1981 and know the
consequences from visits to Boliver Island by ferry from Galveston.
A couple of old guys were talking about it last week before my Tuesday
night church group. One is a retired rig supervisor who had worked his
way up from 'roughneck' in Oklahoma. These are the guys who know what's
going on.

*Take my word for it, these guys know the Gulf. *
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/05/fisherman-blasts-media-exaggerating-gulf-oil-spill-video.php

*The news is massively over-amping this thing*. Obama can't send in the
FEMA squads till there's actually a disaster. It would look pretty
silly on CNN seeing jack booted thugs running around on beaches like this...
http://blog.nj.com/njv_paul_mulshine/index.html

I do think it's an attack on the Gulf Coast economy - a financial
attack. Somebody wants to buy it all up and my hunch is BP and
Haliburton have been vehicles for sabatoge in the Gulf.

Here's the deal. They want to drive the coast fishermen and tourist
industry bankrupt so somebody can swoop in and buy it out for a song.
They would rather do this by killing the tourist season with a rumor of
black beaches and oil soaked sea gulls. I heard camera crews from big
media has been out there in helicopters searching for somewhere -
anywhere - they might find some birds struggling in oil.

The old man gave me the details on the various capping attempts. He
knows what they're doing. Example - a couple weeks ago they lowered a
big cement form around it and poured cement - but they removed the lid
_prematurely_ so it didn't set. That's a sure sign either of
unbelievable incompetence, or what they call up north in the labor
unions "kill the job" (fuck up the job, do it over).

Here's what I think. I think they banked on having just enough
of a spill to hype it up to make the locally owned Gulf coast businesses
that survived Katrina to go belly up.

The more I look into this, the more I want to go down, but I think I'll focus on Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 3:16 pm

There's so much noise out there I don't know what to think. Including the gusher info.

Today, I've decided I'm not going to be part of that problem. I'm not posting any 'news' pieces - interesting, possibly true, blatantly propaganda or disinfo and needing deconstruction, whatever.

I need to start concentrating on my Freedom Camp...

Please post any details of your trip, They Live. Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Tue 08 Jun 2010, 4:07 pm

From active participant to bemused observer.
"What, not perpetuating our thought crimes?"
Expecting the JBTs at my door any moment now... Razz
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Wed 09 Jun 2010, 12:06 am

incognito wrote:
There's so much noise out there I don't know what to think. Including the gusher info.

Today, I've decided I'm not going to be part of that problem. I'm not posting any 'news' pieces - interesting, possibly true, blatantly propaganda or disinfo and needing deconstruction, whatever.

I need to start concentrating on my Freedom Camp...

Please post any details of your trip, They Live. Very Happy
Cogs, wasn't trying to turn you off this story, just wanting to get to the bottom of it myself.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Wed 09 Jun 2010, 3:13 am

Nah, They Live it's not your posts. It's an accumulation of noise. It's not getting me down or anything, it's just wasting my time. I'm more prepared for any disaster than 99.999% percent of the population, I'm forgetting to move on with my life and trust my Creator that everything will be OK. Or not and that's OK too. It's fun deconstructing news and all that but I already know that practically all of it is bullshit and has an agenda that wants me to act one way or another. I need to find a mate and go swim naked under a waterfall with her.
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Wed 09 Jun 2010, 10:56 am

incognito wrote:
Nah, They Live it's not your posts. It's an accumulation of noise. It's not getting me down or anything, it's just wasting my time. I'm more prepared for any disaster than 99.999% percent of the population, I'm forgetting to move on with my life and trust my Creator that everything will be OK. Or not and that's OK too. It's fun deconstructing news and all that but I already know that practically all of it is bullshit and has an agenda that wants me to act one way or another. I need to find a mate and go swim naked under a waterfall with her.
I think the thread on OODA loops is really helpful here in understanding what is going on. They must control our observe and orient part of the loop in order to control us, and to do this, they must flood our world with information and "events" that they control. Pressing the off button is really the only way to regain control over our own perspective.

I think your proposed solution to the issue makes the most sense. Swimming naked under a waterfall with the opposite gender is a lot more important and worthwhile than listening to anything they have to say.

It's time for me to go back to reading Ellul, particularly his Christianity and Anarchy stuff. The guy knew how to talk about faith without bringing screwed-up man-made religions into the discussion. He argued that we don't need stinking government or laws, that God's law is totally sufficient (before it was corrupted by power seeking religious despots) to govern our world, and that the rest should just be left up to chance. He is the only writer who writes about faith that I ever recommend to people, because he is the only one who cuts through all the BS and can appeal to people who have been [deliberately] turned-off of faith by those who corrupt religion.

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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Wed 09 Jun 2010, 12:08 pm

Thanks, C1. Last night I was going over Tavistock and Fankfurt school stuff again and sharing it with FB friends. Also I shared that site that delves into Bertrand's work. There were a few positive responses which is always encouraging. There's a wealth of high value info here, thanks for the OODA loop and Ellul pointer.
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PostSubject: BP: The View from Washington   Fri 11 Jun 2010, 3:28 pm

Meanwhile, back in Washington, D.C.:

June 10, 2010
Louisiana Officials Decry Lack of Leadership
By AVERY FELLOW


WASHINGTON (CN) - Frustrated Louisiana officials told federal lawmakers Thursday that lack of leadership is hurting oil spill relief efforts in the Gulf, allowing oil to wash ashore and devastate wetlands and local economies. "I've spent more time fighting the officials of BP and the Coast Guard than I have fighting the oil," said Billy Nungesser, president of Louisiana's Plaquemines Parish. He said he has sat in meetings where BP, its contractors and the Coast Guard "sit at the table looking at each other while the oil continues to come in."

Most requests placed through the incident command center take more than five days to get to Adm. Thad Allen, the federal director of spill response, Nungesser told the Senate Homeland Security Committee during a hearing to assess the local impact of the spill. He said it took a visit from President Obama to get a sand berm project approved.

"I still don't know who's in charge," he said. "Is it BP or is it the Coast Guard?"
Mayor David Camardelle of Grand Isle, La., a barrier island 60 miles southeast of New Orleans that's home to 1,200 residents, said, "The shrimp dock is a ghost town, the booms don't work -- we need some help."

As out-of-work fishermen wait on checks from BP, Camardelle said he used his own credit card to buy food for their families. "I make $513 dollars a week as mayor," he said, tearing up as Nungesser leaned over and patted him on the back. "I've got my own family to raise."

"We've got people in charge that don't know what they're doing," Nungesser said, holding up pictures of BP spill response contractors trampling pelican nesting grounds.

He called contractors' method of wiping individual blades of grass in the wetlands "an absolute insult."
"That doesn't do anything," Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., agreed.
"Makes a contractor a lot of money," Nungesser said.

Nungesser said he and his team had suggested 100 natural products for wetland application that would "energize the marsh and eat the oil," but BP did not take any of the recommendations.
BP contractors are doing "absolutely nothing but destroying our marsh," Nungesser said.

Louisiana officials added that contractors were "working 20 minutes and resting 10 minutes."
"Would we do that in war?" Nungesser asked. "Because we're at war here."
"Apparently BP doesn't think that oil moves at night," Camardelle said.

Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana said she agreed that the contracting process was "absolutely broken." She said the officials and citizens in the Gulf "up to their knees in oil don't seem to have the resources or authority to get the job done."

Nungesser said more than 3,000 acres of his parish have been destroyed by the spill, "not 30 like the Coast Guard says."

Mark Cooper, director of the Louisiana Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, echoed his sentiment, saying Allen's
statement that the spill had impacted 100 lateral miles "does not reflect the depth of the intrusion into our coastal marshes."

Nungesser called protective boom near the shoreline a "joke," because it washes ashore with oil, and then the parishes are left to deal with oily boom without adequate resources. He added that there were 100 skimmers in a warehouse not being used.

Carmadelle compared the feeling of helplessness of watching oil flow into the marshlands unabated to "playing ping pong with five hundred balls coming at you and one paddle."

Cooper said the problem was that the BP spill was being addressed under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which makes BP head of cleanup efforts and not the government, which would be the case under the Stafford Act, the law applied during the response to Hurricane Katrina.

"The overriding message has been that the federal government cannot provide assistance under OPA like the Stafford Act," Cooper said.
The Stafford Act dictates an immediate local response that extends to a state and federal response when local resources are exhausted.
"There is no real unified command," Cooper said. "That's been the frustration."

"You nailed it on the head," Nelson said. "The problem is command and control."

He said that at the Mobile, Ala., command center, he was told the Coast Guard was 51 percent in charge of spill response while BP was in charge of the rest, percentages that changed depending on who he asked.
"No one is in charge," Nelson said. He proposed sending in the military. "You cannot leave BP in control of this because they're not going to get it done."

"We only have 45 days before a hurricane hits the Gulf of Mexico," Camardelle said. "I just need your help. My hands are tied. I'm dealing with an oil company. We have no say."

"Maybe when you have trouble getting something approved we should just put some BP executives in the oil until they approve it," Sen. John Ensign, R-Nev., suggested.

http://www.courthousenews.com/2010/06/10/27995.htm
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PostSubject: Gulf Oil Spill - Done on purpose - Watch this Liar   Mon 14 Jun 2010, 5:49 pm



If you want to see how puny though disgusting the face of evil is, look at the person of Mr. Suttles...I do think we can RID ourselves of such as these.


Last edited by Explorer on Mon 14 Jun 2010, 10:40 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : fixed typo)
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 14 Jun 2010, 6:19 pm

Waht did he say, exploitation or expiration at 5:56?
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PostSubject: Re: The Oil Spill   Mon 14 Jun 2010, 8:49 pm

incognito wrote:
Waht did he say, exploitation or expiration at 5:56?

"Exploration" I think.

Ciao
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