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 What happens in these days?

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PostSubject: What happens in these days?   Mon 29 Sep 2014, 6:30 am

we in the days blessed the first of the month of Dhul Hijjah, which is held by the rites of the obligatory fifth of Islam and God willing I will explain you all about that duty detail Allah blessed me and you pilgrimage home Grand in Mecca and visit the grave of Mstafah Habib Muhammad peace be upon him in Medina


Hajj is the fifth pillar of Islam, Allah has imposed on the Muslims in the sixth year Hijri, one of the best works, was asked the Messenger of Allah (: Any business better?
He said: (faith in Allah and His Messenger).
It was said: Then what? He said: (Jihad in the way of Allah).
It was said: Then what? He said: (accepted Hajj (the pilgrimage which was mixed with sin.) _ [Agreed]
And Aisha - may Allah be pleased - said: O Messenger of Allah Jihad see the best work do you not strive? He said: (No, but the best Jihad accepted Hajj) _ [Agreed].
The Hajj is an expiation for sins, he said (: (of Hajj and does not and does not immoral act, he returned the day his mother bore him) _ [Agreed]. He also said: ('umrah to an expiation for them, and accepted Hajj brings no less a reward than Paradise) _ [Agreed] said (: (Amar delegation of pilgrims and God, who goes, and they asked him to them gave He) _ [Bazaar].

Hajj and cleanses the soul and restores clarity and fidelity, and that it would be human to be patient and endure, and Hajj implanted in the soul the spirit of bondage full of God, and submission true to the law of God, and the pilgrimage leads a person to God grateful for the blessing of money and blessing of wellness.

Hajj and lead to long relationship with the Muslims, including different colors, languages and home, and feel more strongly the Association of Islamic brotherhood, and helps to spread the call of Islam, as it is a popular conference to address the Muslims and to identify the conditions, and discuss their problems.

The conditions of Hajj being obligatory:
1 - Islam, Hajj is not obligatory on the infidel.
2 - puberty, there must be a boy, even pilgrimage boy before puberty, is not acceptable for duty after puberty, but to perform Hajj once again, for saying (: (Any boy Ag then reached Perjury (age of reference), he should do Hajj again) _ [ Tabarani].
3 - the mind, not on the pilgrimage crazy, but do not correct it.
4 - freedom, Not a slave
5 - Being, so that it is able to withstand the hardship of travel, and that he has enough is enough of having to beg until he returns.
And women, like men in the conditions of Hajj being obligatory but it is essential that accompanied a husband or a mahram, or be with her trustworthy women
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTJZXfaY54w
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Tue 07 Oct 2014, 5:09 am

The pilgrims begin arriving by air, sea, and land during the weeks prior to the pilgrimage period. They usually arrive into Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the major port city nearest to Mecca (45 miles distance). From there they travel with their Hajj group to Mecca. As they approach Mecca, they stop at one of the designated areas to shower and change clothing, entering into a state of devotion and purity for the pilgrimage.


Ihram

Ihram is the intention of the person willing to perform all rites of 'Umrah, Hajj or both when he arrives at the Miqat. Each direction coming into Makkah has its own Miqat. It is recommended that the one who intends to perform Hajj makes Ghusl (a shower with the intention to purify one's self), perfumes his body, but not his garments, and puts on a two piece garment with no headgear. The garments should be of seamless cloth. One piece to cover the upper part of the body, and the second to cover the lower part. For a woman the Ihram is the same except that she should not use perfumes at all and her dress should cover the whole body decently, leaving the hands and the face uncovered. The pilgrim should say the intention according to the type of Hajj. For Hajj Al-Tamatt'u one should say: "Labbayka Allahumma 'Umrah" which means "O Allah I answered Your call to perform 'Umrah". It is recommended to repeat the well known supplication of Hajj, called Talbeyah, as frequently as possible from the time of Ihram till the time of the first stoning of Jamrat Al-Aqabah in Mina. Men are recommended to utter the Talbeyah aloud while women are to say it quietly. This Talbeyah is of the form:

"Labbayka Allahumma Labbayk. Labbayka La Shareeka Laka Labbayk. Inna-alhamda Wan-ntimata Laka Walmulk. La Shareek Lak." (Here I am at your service. O my Lord, here I am. Here I am. No partner do You have. Here I am. Truly, the praise and the provisions are Yours, and so is the dominion. No partner do You have.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fzC_lkIIHs&feature=fvst
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Sun 12 Oct 2014, 5:25 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0H6FzqLIKI

Tawaf: When a Muslim arrives to Makkah, he should make Tawaf around the Ka'bah, as a gesture of greeting A1Masjid Al-Haraam. This is done by circling the Ka'bah seven times in the counterclockwise direction, starting from the black stone with Takbeer and ending each circle at the Black Stone with Takbeer, keeping the Ka'bah to one's left. Then the pilgrim goes to Maqam Ibrahim (Ibrahim's Station), and performs two rak'ah behind it, close to it if possible, but away from the path of the people making Tawaf. In all cases one should be facing the Ka'bah when praying behind Maqam Ibrahim.

Sa'i: The next rite is to make Sa'i between Safa and Marwah. The pilgrim starts Sa'i by ascending the Safa. While facing the Ka'bah he praises Allah, raises his hands and says Takbeer "Allah-u Akbar" three times, then makes supplication to Allah. Then the pilgrim descends from the Safa and heads towards the Marwah. One should increase the pace between the clearly marked green posts, but should walk at a normal pace before and after them. When the pilgrim reaches the Marwah, he should ascend it, praise Allah and do as he did at the Safa. This is considered one round and so is the other way from the Marwah to the Safa. A total of seven rounds are required to perform the Sa'i. After Sa'i, the Muslim ends his 'Umrah rites by shaving his head or trimming his hair (women should cut a finger tip's length from their hair). At this stage, the prohibitions pertaining to the state of Ihram are lifted and one can resume his normal life.

There are no required formulas or supplications for Tawaf or for Sa'i. It is up to the worshipper to praise Allah or to supplicate Him with any acceptable supplication or to recite portions of the Qur'an. Although it is recommended to recite the supplications that the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, used to say during the performance of these rites.

It must be noted that 'Umrah can be performed by itself as described above at any time of the year.
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Fri 17 Oct 2014, 4:47 am

Going out to Mina on the day of Tarwiah

A pilgrim performing Hajj AlTamatt'u should intend Ihram, from the place where he is staying, on the 8th day of Thul-Hijjah, which is the Tarwiah Day, and leave to Mina in the morning. In Mina, the pilgrims pray Dhuhr, Asr, Maghrib and Isha of the 8th day of ThulHijjah and Fajr of the 9th day of ThulHijjah. Dhuhr, Asr and Isha are each shortened to two Rak'ah only, but are not combined. The pilgrim remains in Mina until sunrise of the 9th day of ThulHijjah and then leaves to Arafat


--- Day 2 of the Pilgrimage (9th of Dhul-Hijjah)

On the second day of the pilgrimage, the pilgrims leave Mina just after dawn to travel to the Plain of Arafat for the culminating experience of the Hajj. On what is known as the "Day of Arafat," the pilgrims spend the entire day standing (or sitting) near the Mount of Mercy, asking Allah for forgiveness and making supplications. Muslims around the world who are not at the pilgrimage join them in spirit by fasting for the day.

After sunset on the Day of Arafat, the pilgrims leave and travel to a nearby open plain called Muzdalifah, roughly halfway between Arafat and Mina. There they spend the night praying, and collecting small stone pebbles to be used the following day.



Departure to Arafat

On the 9th day of Thul-Hijjah, the Day of Arafat, the pilgrims stay in Arafat until sunset. The pilgrims pray Dhuhr and Asr at Arafat, shortened and combined dur ing the time of Dhuhr to save the rest of the day for glorifying Allah and for supplication asking forgiveness. A pilgrim should make sure that he is within the boundaries of Arafat, not necessarily standing on the mountain of Arafat. The Prophet salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, said: "I stood here on this rocky hill and all Arafat is a standing place" Muslim. One should keep reciting Talbeyah, glorifying Allah the Greatest and repeating supplication. It is also reported that the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, used to say the following supplication: "There is no deity worthy of worship except Allah, the One without a partner. The dominion and the praise are His and He is powerful over everything. " Anas Ibn Malik was asked once how he and his friends used to spend their time while walking from Mina to Arafat in the company of the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam. Anas said: "Some of us used to cry out Talbeyah, others used to glorify Allah the Greatest and the rest used to repeat prayers. Each one of us was free to worship Allah in the way he likes without prejudice or renunciation of his right. " Bukhari.

In the vast square plain of Arafat, tears are shed, sins are washed and faults are redressed for those who ask Allah for forgiveness and offer sincere repentance for their wrong doings in the past. Happy is the person who receives the Mercy and Pleasure of Allah on this particular day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnQZZFQ7ldk
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Thu 23 Oct 2014, 3:47 am

What is inside the kaaba?


There are two pillars inside (others report 3 pillars)
There is a table on the side to put items like perfume
There are two lantern-type lamps hanging from the ceiling
The space can accommodate about 50 people
There are no electric lights inside
The walls and floors are of marble
There are no windows inside
There is only one door
The upper inside walls of the kaaba were covered with some kind of curtain with the Kalima written on it.


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The departure from Arafat

Soon after sunset on the Day of Arafat, the pilgrims leave for Muzdalifah quietly and reverently in compliance with the advice of the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, who said when he noticed people walking without calmness: "O people! Be quiet, hastening is not a sign of righteousness." Bukhari. In order to follow the example of the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, it is preferable to keep reciting the Talbeyah, glorifying Allah the Greatest and mentioning the name of Allah until the time of stoning Jamrat Al-Aqabah (a stone pillar in Mina). In Muzdalifah, the pilgrim performs Maghrib and Isha prayers combined, shortening the Isha prayer to two Rak'ah.Pilgrims stay overnight in Muzdalifah to perform the Fajr prayer and wait until the brightness of the morning is widespread before they leave to Mina passing through the sacred Mash'ar valley.

Women and weak individuals are allowed to proceed to Mina at any time after midnight to avoid the crowd.


Stoning Jamrat Al-Aqabah

When the pilgrims arrive at Mina, they go to Jamrat Al-Aqabah where they stone it with seven pebbles glorifying Allah "Allah-u Akbar" at each throw and calling on Him to accept their Hajj. The time of stoning Jamrat Al-Aqabah is after sunrise. The Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, threw the pebbles late in the morning and permitted weak people to stone after leaving Muzdalifah after midnight. The size of the pebbles should not be more than that of a bean as described by the Prophet, salla Allahu alaihe wa salam, who warned against exaggeration. The pebbles can be picked up either in Muzdalifah or in Mina.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBkubo9PKI8
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Sun 26 Oct 2014, 5:26 am

After stoning Jamrat Al-Aqabah, the pilgrim goes to slaughter his sacrifice either personally or through the appointment of somebody else to do it on his behalf. A pilgrim should slaughter either a sheep, or share a cow or a camel with six others.


Shaving the head or trimming the hair

The final rite on the tenth day after offering his sacrifice is to shave one' s head or to cut some of the hair. Shaving the head is, however, preferable for it was reported that the Prophet prayed three times for those who shaved their heads, when he said: "May Allah's Mercy be upon those who shaved their heads." Bukhari and Muslim. For women, the length of hair to be cut is that of a finger tip. The stoning of Jamrat Al-Aqabah and the shaving of head or trimming of hair symbolizes the end of the first phase of the state of Ihram and the lifting of its restrictions except for intimate intercourse with one's spouse. Stoning Jamrat Al-Aqabah, slaughtering the sacrifice and shaving the head or cutting part of the hair are preferred to be in this order, as it is the order that the Prophet, salla Allah-u alaihe wa salam, did them. However, if they are done in any other order, there is no harm in that.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nmPR0eziwQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKtQN1ZYplY
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Thu 30 Oct 2014, 4:32 am

Tawaf Al-Ifadhah

Tawaf Al-Ifadhah is a fundamental rite of Hajj. The pilgrim makes Tawaf-AIIfadhah by visiting Al-Masjid AlHaraam and circling the Ka'bah seven times and praying two Rak'ah behind Maqam Ibrahim. Then the pilgrim should make Sa'i between the Safa and the Marwah. After Tawaf Al-Ifadhah the state of Ihram is completely ended and all restrictions are lifted including intimate intercourse with one's spouse.

Tawaf Al-Ifadhah can be delayed until the days spent at Mina are over.


Return to Mina

The pilgrim should return to Mina and spend there the days of Tashreeq (i.e. the I I th, 1 2th and 1 3th day of Thul-Hijjah). l During each day, and after Dhuhr prayer, | the pilgrim stones the three stone pillars called "Jamarat": The small, the medium and Jamrat Al-Aqabah, glorifying Allah "Allah-u Akbar" with each throw of the seven pebbles stoned at each pillar. These pebbles are picked up in Mina. A l Pilgrim may leave Mina to Makkah on the 13th of Thul-Hijjah or on the 12th if he wishes, there is no blame on him if he chooses the later, but he has to leave before sunset.


Farewell Tawaf

Farewell Tawaf is the final rite of Hajj. It is to make another Tawaf around the Ka'bah. Ibn Abbas said: "The people were ordered to perform the Tawaf around the Ka'bah as the last thing before leaving Makkah, except the menstruating women who were excused." Bukhari.


\\\\\\\\\\


A Saudi official announced that the number of pilgrims this year increased by 8% to record the total number of 3 million, 573 thousand, 161 pilgrims in 2012


This is a miracle to watch and meditation
Abraham, peace be upon him alone in the desert and called out then meets the call of millions over the centuries without interruption


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aebi2atfqoE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4bRfd-wcUs

\\\\\\\\\\
Many people
Want to know the Hajj
What happens there?

What is the purpose of that?

Curiosity and suspense
This is a miracle to watch and meditation
Abraham, peace be upon him alone in the desert and called out then meets the call of millions over the centuries without interruption

allah Almighty make this matter easier for pilgrims

And psychological feelings and patience in this place is different from anywhere else

I ask God Almighty that gives you the opportunity to perform Hajj
And the experience of those sentiments
And filled with tears of tenderness
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Mon 21 Sep 2015, 5:02 am

Now


More than 2 million people surround me. We all have one common goal, one purpose for being here together. I do not stand out from anyone else. There are no signs of wealth or greatness upon me. No Rolex watch or Nike shoes to mark me as a rich person. I am one person alone, in a sea of humanity. I am black or white, yellow or brown, the colour of my skin is not important. I am from Europe or Asia or South America, my homeland is any corner of this wide earth. The people around me are young and old, male and female, rich and poor. We represent humankind in our diversity, yet we are united. We are unity in diversity.
I am at Hajj

Hajj is one of the five pillars of Islam. Muslims declare that there is no god worthy of worship but Allah and that Muhammad is His messenger; they pray, they fast, they pay obligatory charity, and they go to Hajj. Hajj is a pilgrimage to the city of Makah in Saudi Arabia. At the mosque and in the surrounding area, Muslims perform prayers and rituals. Hajj is an obligatory act performed once in a lifetime by all mentally, physically, and financially able Muslims.

“And Hajj (pilgrimage to Makah) to the House (Kaba) is a duty that mankind owes to God, those who can afford the expenses (for one’s conveyance, provision and residence) ; and whoever disbelieves then God stands not in need of any of mankind, jinn and all that exists” (Quran 3:97)
Muslims from all over the world will gather to worship God. They arrive in Saudi Arabia, by plane, bus, car, etc. Some endure great hardship, others merely buy a first class ticket, but they come as equals. People make this journey prepared to stand at the House of God (or Kaba) and affirm their love for God and His religion of Islam.

“And proclaim to humankind the Hajj (pilgrimage). They will come to you on foot and on every lean camel, they will come from every deep and distant (wide) mountain highway (to perform Hajj)” (Quran 22:27)

The Hajj is several days of total devotion to the One God. Muslims come together to celebrate His praises, ask for His forgiveness and demonstrate unity for His sake alone.

Throughout the Muslim world, Hajj has come to symbolise unity. Although Muslims may be disunited due to many outside influences, such as money, politics, border disputes or other worldly concerns. Hajj is the great leveller. At Hajj, all Muslims are equal; nothing about the rituals they perform makes one person better than another.

More than 2 million Muslims stand in one place, wearing the same simple clothing, following the same rituals and saying the same words. They are united in their devotion to God. The black man stands next to the white man and they call on God with one voice. The king stands beside the pauper and they declare their submission to the will of God using the same words.

Muslims from every corner of the globe are united in their submission to the will of God. They cry out as if with one voice, “Here I am O God, here I am at your service, and You have no partner. Here I am. All praise, grace, and dominion belong to You. You have no partner”. This supplication is said repeatedly by the pilgrims. It is their answer to God’s call for the Muslims to perform Hajj.

These words are repeated with joy and reverence by all, regardless of status or class. Some people are so overcome with emotion that they weep, others feel elated and happier then they have ever felt before. Every person there feels that he is one person, alone among millions answering God’s call and God hears his supplication and sees his arrival. The pilgrims feel amazed that they are the guest of the most Merciful God. He or she attends this gathering by the invitation of God, not at the invitation of a government or an organisation, nor at the request of a family member or friend.

Hajj is performed because God has invited the believers to congregate together. Regardless of place of birth, nationality, ethnicity, gender, or status, all are welcome, and all are equal in the sight of God. The Muslims gather to meet one another and demonstrate to each other, and the world that they are united. Unity in diversity. They are united by their worship of One God.

“O humankind! We have created you from a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that you may know one another. Verily, the most honourable of you with God is that (believer) who has At-Taqwa (piety, God consciousness). Verily, God is All-Knowing, All-Aware.” (Quran 39:13)

Islam is the religion of unity. Repeatedly throughout the Quran God reminds the believers that they must remain united and seek strength through unity. Hajj epitomises this unity. People from every race and colour come together in submission to the will of God. Muslims are one brotherhood and they come together with a sense of purpose and a desire for peace.

“The believers are nothing else but brothers (in Islam). So make reconciliation between your brothers, and fear God, that you may receive mercy.” (Quran 39:10)

“And hold fast, all of you together, to the Rope of God (this Quran), and be not divided among yourselves, and remember God’s Favour on you, for you were enemies one to another but He joined your hearts together, so that, by His Grace, you became brethren (in Islam), and you were on the brink of a pit of Fire, and He saved you from it. Thus God makes His Ayat (proofs, evidences, verses, lessons, signs, revelations, etc.,) clear to you, that you may be guided.” (Quran 3:103)

Hajj is the largest annual gathering of Muslims; it is the largest gathering of people united by the peacefulness and serenity that is Islam. Anything that disturbs the peacefulness of Hajj is prohibited. No matter what is happening in the material world at Hajj, peace prevails.

Muslims gather together and their diversity is a wonder to behold. The old stand with the young, the rich stand with the poor, people of all colours and nationalities stand shoulder to shoulder in prayer, and perform rituals side by side. Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, said, “In their love, kindness, and compassion for each other, the believers are like a human body.[1] Muslims at Hajj are one people, they are a soothing sea of humanity, gathered together to worship One God. Muslims turn their faces in one direction and submit to the will of God. They are united by their love of God, and united in their diversity.

Pilgrimage (Hajj) in Makkah with TheDeenShow
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHaXyakG0oo

An American In Mecca
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96l7VJkaYjc

22 Born American who converted to Islam and went to Hajj
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNZ1wLq65Og
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Wed 23 Sep 2015, 5:48 am

The twelfth month of the Islamic calendar is called Dhul Hijjah. It is the month that contains one of the greatest pillars of Islam – Hajj or the major pilgrimage. It also contains one of only two Islamic reoccurring festivals, Eid ul Adha. These two special occasions, the Hajj and Eid ul Adha, are inextricably linked by one special man, Prophet Ibrahim, known in Jewish and Christian traditions as Prophet Abraham.

Making the pilgrimage is often called following in the footsteps of Ibrahim. This is due to the fact that the rituals involved in the pilgrimage replicate many of the events in Prophet Ibrahim’s life. Eid ul Adha commemorates a specific trial in the life of Ibrahim. He was commanded by God to sacrifice, his son Ishmael. Eid ul Adha occurs on the 10th day of Dhul Hijjah, the day on which most of the Hajj rites have been preformed and the pilgrims slaughter an animal to honour Prophet Ibrahim’s obedience to God.

“Surely Ibrahim was an example, obedient to God, by nature upright, and he was not of the polytheists. He was grateful for Our bounties. We chose him and guided him unto a right path. We gave him good in this world, and in the next he will most surely be among the righteous.” (Quran 16:120-121)

In a divinely inspired dream, Ibrahim saw himself sacrificing his son Ishmael. All members of Ibrahim’s family demonstrated complete trust in God, therefore Ibrahim revealed the dream to Ishmael. He readily agreed that his father must carry out the command of God. Together they went to the place of sacrifice and offered Ishmael’s life to God. Ibrahim prepared to sacrifice his beloved son. At this point the shaytaan (satan) tempted Ibrahim trying to make him disobey God, but Ibrahim resisted and drove the shaytaan away. Ibrahim looked down at his son for what he believed was the last time but as the blade came close to Ishmael’s neck God stayed his hand and revealed that there was no need for Ibrahim to continue. His sacrifice had already been fulfilled.

Giving up something big for the sake of God, such as the life of your child, must seem like a huge and unimaginable sacrifice. Today even going without something small, such as a cup of coffee, to donate the money to charity seems like a large sacrifice. Try to imagine how Ibrahim must have felt as he held the blade above his child’s neck. In the last moment he was relieved of his duty to follow God’s commands. Having complete trust in God, knowing with certainty that God knows and wants what is best for us is often difficult, but it should not be.

“…And whosoever fears God and keeps his duty to Him, He will make a way for him to get out (from every difficulty). And He will provide him from (sources) he never could imagine….” (Quran 65:2-3)

God replaced Ishmael with a sheep and it is for this reason that Muslims sacrifice an animal on the celebration of Eid ul Adha; however it is more than a celebration, it is a reminder. We are reminded of our own submission to the will of God. Those Muslim’s who are not making the pilgrimage and who can afford it sacrifice an animal in remembrance of Prophet Ibrahim’s test.

“Their meat will not reach Allah, nor will their blood, but what reaches Him is piety from you….” (Quran 22:37)

The act of animal sacrifice is often misunderstood. God has no need for the blood or the meat; in fact God has no need for any of our acts of worship. However for our own benefit God commands us to turn to Him and obey Him. God looks for our piety, our goodness and our charity. The animal sacrificed is usually a sheep, a goat or a cow.

Distributing the meat from the sacrifice of Eid al-Adha strengthens many of our efforts to please God with our piety. Usually, a portion is eaten by the immediate family and relatives, a portion is given away to friends and neighbours and a portion is donated to the poor. The act symbolizes our willingness to give up our bounties to strengthen ties of kinship and friendship and our enthusiasm to give up things that are of benefit to us in order to help those who are in need. In the sacrifice we recognize that all blessings come from God.

Eid ul Adha commences on the 10th day of Dhul Hijjah. For those who are not at the pilgrimage, it begins with an extra early morning prayer performed in congregation, called the Eid prayer. It is a time of celebration, a time to visit family and friends and thank God for all the blessings He has bestowed upon us. It demands contact with relatives, kindness to family and neighbours, and empathy and compassion for the poor. Above all Eid ul Adha reminds us that God is great and that He is the source of all bounties. Through the good times and the trying times God is the source of all comfort and all peace, and submission to Him brings the greatest benefits of all.

IAMC Eid ul Adha 2013 Khutbah:: Nouman Ali Khan: The Sacrifice of Prophet Ibrahim
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRPesQUApkw
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PostSubject: Re: What happens in these days?   Wed 07 Sep 2016, 2:23 am

islam is a monotheistic religion; Muslims worship God ONLY not the Ka'bah or anything else. While turning around the Ka'bah, Muslims chant: "there is no deity worthy of worship but God."

The Ka'bah is for unifying Muslims at prayers, as it would be chaotic if Muslims pray in any direction they choose.

The Ka'abah provides a chance to unity in prayers as all Muslims face only one spot throughout the globe.

It's a religious ritual that goes back to prophet Ibrahim, peace be upon him.

At the time of prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, people even used to stand and give the call to prayer. One may ask those who allege that Muslims worship the Ka'bah: how come an idol-worshipper stands on the idol he worships?!

Muslims pray towards the Ka'bah as it has spiritual bond; it unites Muslims and equalizes between them.

The Jews pray before the Wailing Wall, yet they do not worship it; they just pray towards it.

It has been proven that Makkah is in the center of the earth and that the meridian of makkah is the only meridian in which the real north and the magnetic north meet and there is no magnetic deflection. There is electromagnetic energy and as you approach the Ka'bah, you are released from negative energy then filled with the Divine Energy.
So Muslims do not worship the Kaaba


Dr Zakir Naik speaking about Hajj - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOgc7unDerw

Do Muslims Worship the KA'BAH ? Dr. Zakir Naik (Urdu)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9MqYyFhpKM

Dr Zakir Naik about Hajj e badal and Does stonning during hajj hurt shaitan?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjoQ5-mn2rU
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